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7 years, 500 Posts, 750 followers, 1000 comments, 750,000 visitors….

March 13, 2017 Leave a comment

When I started this blog as something to keep me occupied until I found another job after our life affirming round the world trip, I could never have realised just how important it would become to me.

This post is my 500th since April 2010. In the intervening seven years of writing about all kinds of weird and wonderful things, my site has been visited more than three quarters of a million times and well over 1000 people have taken the time to respond to my ideas. I’ve met some really wonderful people from all over the country, people I now consider to be good friends and who I would never have met if I hadn’t picked up my digital pen…

Through writing this blog, I’ve also learnt so much, researching sometimes tangential subject areas to better assess what it is I’m trying to say. I’ve also been lucky enough to have had my work published in “proper” hard copy magazines which, along with requests to use my drawings and ideas for research projects and in other articles, has given me immense satisfaction.

All of which is really quite remarkable and very humbling. Although my post rate has fallen over the last few years and my target of five posts a month has been well and truly missed many times, the need to write about things that interest me is always there and whether anyone reads my words or not, has never really been the point anyway.

So a huge thank you to everyone who has taken the time to visit, comment, share and like. It’s all very much appreciated.

Not sure where the UK will be in another seven years time, still dealing with the monumentally stupid decision to leave the EU I suspect, and I can’t even begin to think about how old I’ll be then. But I think I can be confident in saying that the arts, architecture, music and culture in general will all still be going strong, creating pleasure, annoyance and confusion in equal measure as they always have done.

So presumably there will still be lots for me to write about in 2024, not least of which will be the Olympics, que some gratuitous graphics and shameless Olympic related JoeBlogs post links, link 2, link 3). I hope you can join me along the way…

PS.… I’ve just realised that if you divide the 500 posts across the 84 months that make up 7 years, the average per month is very nearly 6 posts… So I am still on target, which is nice…

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New Neighbours….

February 4, 2017 Leave a comment

I’ve been reading about the recently announced Santiago Calatrava designed centerpiece of the Greenwich peninsular development, now named somewhat prosaically as Peninsular Place…

The beautifully crafted image below shows not only the magnificence of the River Thames meandering its way peacefully along, but if you look carefully you can also see our little flat, just over the river at the bottom of the Isle of Dogs…

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And then if you look again at the Peninsular itself, you will see what looks like thousands and thousands of new homes, in fact 15,720 new homes. Now, I don’t consider myself to be a nimby, far from it. I’m an Architect after all, involved in some pretty large residential and mixed use development schemes across London. We need homes, we need tens of thousands of affordable new homes going forward (the general feeling is about 200 thousand by the year 2020) so developments like this are both exciting and necessary…

And yet, and yet…

Is the image below really what we think future residential ares of London should look like? My partner quite rightly points out that this could be Singapore or Kuala Lumpur or Dubai… not saying that’s bad for them, but there’s not much that speaks of London about these rather ungainly shapes.. Calatrava is without doubt a gifted architect, but this to me looks very much misplaced, out of scale and borrowed from somewhere with an altogether different climate…

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And as for affordability, only 200 of the first phase of 800 new homes will be affordable, so whilst at 25% that’s an improvement on the average 10% that Boris managed, its still much lower than the 40% that good old Ken insisted on and the likely 60 to 70% that we really need if the upcoming generations are to have any hope of home ownership..

And then of course there’s the definition of affordability itself.. One beds over here on the Island are between £350K and £500K at the moment, and I can’t help but wonder how much similar homes will cost in 5 years time when they start to become available, probably not very affordable for your average Londoner…

Finally as you watch the video, try and image what the Jubilee Line will be like first thing on a Monday morning once its complete…

 

Concrete Frieze, Rochester Row, SW1 : Definitely a William Mitchell…

December 11, 2016 2 comments

My good friend the artist Bill Mitchell was contacted recently by yet another of the growing band of admirers of his work. An email arrived from someone who works near Emanuel House on Rochester Row, SW10 and who had in passing it regularly, come to love the work. Spanning the entire front elevation of Emanuel House is a narrow, but perfectly formed concrete frieze, which undoubtedly has the tell tale style of a Mitchell…

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The reason the admirer made contact however, was to try and ascertain who the originator of the work was. As with much of Bill’s work, online references are few and far between and those that can be found are not always correct. As indeed was the case with this piece, which according to the email, was attributed to someone else even in “official” records.

Bill and his wife Joy have asked if there was anything I could do to help, and so in my own small way, by posting this here, I’m hoping to set the records straight for anyone else who notices and wonders at this little gem of a sculpture and tries to find out more…

In the words of the great man himself…

“This was the first integral piece of concrete art ever produced. It’s a ‘ring beam’ which linked all the columns and on which the remainder of the structure depended. I designed it, made the moulds and the builder poured the concrete.

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When I recall all the rows with structural engineers, and architects, plus the criticism from the art establishments of the time (including the Art’s Council) and the broadsides from the press – it was apparently obvious to everyone except me, why this work shouldn’t be made. Afterwards of course once it was finished, everyone agreed that it was the right thing to do, giving interest to this and many other, bleak concrete buildings thereafter, both through my own work and via the many copies.

Now I understand that the ring beam at Victoria has been attributed to someone else. This is astonishing, my work at Emanuel House was a piece of history and because of it many art critics made their names and fortunes whilst I and the builder lost money.

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I continued to produce public works of art and now and then when I find that some of my works have been attributed to other artists, it only serves to illustrate for me the philosophy of the time, that ‘art’ should only be in frames, and hung on the walls of London West End galleries…”

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(Apologies for the images, they’re screen grabs cobbled together this afternoon from Google street view.. I’ll update the post once I’ve been and seen the work for myself…)

Kraftwerk at the Royal Albert Hall

November 5, 2016 3 comments

99c3f134-cf55-4980-acc4-da0d3acf7d23A couple of weeks ago my very good friend Danny heorically did the tedious cyclical internet thing that is sadly now standard for these big events, and managed to get tickets for the Kraftwerk gigs next June at the Royal Albert Hall.

Despite it being more than 8 months away, to say I’m excited would be an understatement, and the show will hopefully go someway to making up for the frustration of not getting tickets for the Tate gigs a few years ago.

It won’t be the first time I’ve seen Kraftwerk with Danny, although that didn’t quite work out as we’d hoped…

Back in 1996 (which I’ve just realised was 20 years ago…) we were at The Tribal Gathering Festival at Sutton Hoo, where along with a hugely impressive line up of artists including Orbital, Daft Punk, Gus Gus, Digweed, Sasha, Jeff Mills, Hardfloor, Marshal Jefferson, Masters at Work, John Peel, Fabio & Grooverider etc etc, the mysterious Dusseldorfers were down to play their first live set in the UK for five years…

2bolptgUnfortunately we got carried away with the quality and excellence of the day, misjudged the number of people that were there specifically to see Kraftwerk, and headed rather belatedly to the Trans Europe tent only to find it was super rammed. The closest we could get was behind about ten rows of people outside the entrance to the tent. Amazingly (and I honestly don’t think this would happen nowadays) the organisers took down half of one side of the tent, so that people outside could at least see the lights and hear a bit better…

I think we stayed for 4 or 5 tunes before giving it up as a bad job and heading off elsewhere. Orbital as I remember were absolutely outstanding that day…

So, fingers crossed that next years shows in the wonderours surroundings of the Royal Albert Hall will go some way to addressing the paucity of my live Kraftwerk experience…

The only slightly nagging doubt is the description of the concerts as 3-D. This could mean that we’re all wearing funny specs and in for a stunningly visual treat, but it might also mean that the single remaining original Werker, Ralph Hutter, might not actually be there in person, opting instead to send the bands robot avatars to enteratin us…

We shall see, but regardless, when that car door slams shut and the VW Beetle ignition turns over, I for one will be a very happy man….

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A Freestyle No. 1: Kungs vs Cookin’ on 3 Burners

June 17, 2016 Leave a comment

My very good friend Dan told me last night that a reworked version of a tune by a band called Cookin’ on 3 Burners from his Freestyle Records label had reached the midweek number 1 slot in the UK.. the first time in his more than 25 years of trading that he’s achieved such a thing..

With a wry smile on his face, he pointed me towards Spotify where the tune, This Girl by Kungs vs Cookin’ on 3 Burners (which has already hit the top spot in Germany, Belgium and somewhere else in Euroland) has racked up nearly 39 million hits.. There’s a similar story on YouTube where the current total is in excess of 23 million views….

So here it is.. Apparently Kungs is a protege of David Guetta who has obviously taught him a thing or two about boiling a tune down to 2 or 3 key elements, upping the tempo and adding in a drop and/ or synth stab to get the kids going…

And here’s the original version as found on Freestyle Records, as laid back and soulful as you’d expect…

So huge congrats to Danny. I know the revenue payments from these streaming giants can be pretty derisory, but by my reckoning, any share of more than 60 million of anything, no matter how small, is likely to keep the smile on his face for many weeks to come.

Going to the Dogs…

November 8, 2015 4 comments

CoverA couple of years or so ago, I was looking through one of the many second hand shops on the Walworth Road when I was working down in that neck of the woods, and came across a box of old magazines published in the early 1970’s by the Architectural Association, a highly regarded institution based here in London.

11One magazine in particular caught my attention as it contained an article about my own bit of London, The Isle of Dogs. So I handed over my 50p, read the article on my way home that evening, told And all about it, agreed that we should follow the route the first sunny Sunday that came along, and then promptly forgot all about it…

Until recently that is, when I was asked about my island life, and whether I thought the place was worth visiting. After I’d said yes of course, it’s a brilliant place, I remembered the magazine and scanned the article for this post.

Spread out over 10 pages was a fascinating walk through the Isle of Dogs. Written originally back in early 1972, it describes the island as I can only now imagine it, a fact brought home by the opening paragraph which reads..

“The Isle of Dogs shares with Tibet and Timbuctoo, the reputation for being one of the least inhabited parts of the habitable globe”..

Obviously the opinion of an architectural academic and not one of the local islanders, the writer (Hubert Murray) begins his introduction to the walk with reference to a recent Tower Hamlets Planning survey that recorded the most common complaints of the people who lived on the Island (poor bus services, poor shops, lack of schools and too many tower blocks being the most common) and ends it with the bombshell that nothing was likely to happen in the short term until a decision had been made about whether to build an urban motorway across the IoD, a drastic and disastrous sounding solution to relieve traffic problems in  Greenwich and Blackheath… Remember this is nearly 10 years before the LDDC was set up in 1981 to create the success/ wonder/ hell hole/ expensive/polarised/ integrated/ etc. etc. (delete as appropriate) place that the Island has become today…

The walk starts at the top of the island on the east side in Poplar at the recently completed Robin Hood Gardens (a big favorite of the architectural profession at that time), heads down to Island Gardens before heading up around the west to Limehouse. Sights and landmarks on the way include: The Gun, Kelson House, The Watermans Arms, Edies Cafe, various allotments and the Globe Ropeworks building (now sadly long gone).

It makes for interesting reading, describing an area that has, for better or worse, long since been polished up, and one day I’d like to think we really will get round to following the route, finding some of the locations of these photos and seeing what still remains 43 years later…. 14

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Chris Squire – RIP

June 29, 2015 Leave a comment

I’m very saddened to learn of the death yesterday (27th June) from leukaemia, of Chris Squire, the bass player and only member of the prog band Yes to play on every single studio record they made, from their formation way back in 1968 until last years… erm, whatever it was called (to be honest, I gave up listening to the new records many moons ago…)

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But back in my teenage days, I was a huge Yes fan. I got my mum to embroider their wondrous Roger Dean designed logo on the back of my denim jacket, bought American imports of records I already had just because they had different covers and paid ridiculous sums of money for 12″ singles on blue vinyl…

The trio of records they released during 1971 and 72, namely The Yes Album, Fragile and Close to the Edge meant more to me musically than virtually anything else, and until my discovery of Kraftwerk and Tangerine Dream in the mid 80’s when I went to Uni and headed inexorably towards the electronica that makes my ears happy today, I would eagerly espouse their merits to anyone within earshot…. I still rate Close to Edge very highly, so much so it inspired one of my tattoos

A truly phenomenal bass player, the complex patterns, lines and rhythms Chris created using his trademark Rickenbacker 4001 are certainly not to everyone’s taste, but his technical ability was beyond doubt. The sad irony is that I saw an advert only 2 days ago in Saturday’s Guardian Guide for a Yes gig next year at the Albert Hall, where they planned to play two albums, Fragile and Drama all the way through… And said I should go, for old times sake, and I admit I was thinking about it…

Now I guess it won’t happen… Yes are famous for having replaced every single member of the band at one time or the other over their 46 odd year career, but somehow a Yes without Chris Squire, surely that’s a step too far. The journey had to end sometime…

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